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Registration Handbook

A Comprehensive Guide for Students and their Families Planning for High School and Beyond

To our students and families:

This handbook is meant to help you in the continuing journey of becoming a curious and confident learner during your high school years and beyond! It is our hope that from your first day of ninth grade, and through graduation, you make the informed decision to challenge yourself with a rigorous course load and aim for what inspires you beyond high school. High school graduation along with a clear vision for a joyful and successful post-high school life are our goals for each and every FHS scholar!

 As a high school student, the prospect of making plans for the years after graduation may appear complex, daunting, exhilarating and/or exciting. As you move through high school and transition from dependence to independence, it is incumbent upon our work together to prepare you for any post-high school opportunity. After high school, whether you intend to go on to a two-year or four-year college/university, a tech or trade school, enter the workforce or join the military, it is necessary to challenge yourself beginning in ninth grade. By doing so, you will be committing yourself to growth in your personal, academic, and career goals beyond high school.

 In this handbook, you will be introduced to the Washington State, Seattle School District, and Franklin High School policies, guidelines, and requirements for high school graduation for 2021-22 and beyond. Within the graduation requirements set by the Washington State legislature, you will find an emphasis upon meeting certain proficiency standards or levels (as measured by the state Smarter Balanced tests or other alternative graduation pathways), completing a culminating (Senior) project requiring a research, writing, and presentation piece, completion of a “High School and Beyond” plan (outlining goals for your high school years and the first year after graduation), and completing 60 service learning hours. The Seattle School District has amended the high school graduation credit distribution requirements and has refined the skill-based proficiencies to comply with new Washington State guidelines.

 In the sections covering planning and registration, you will find course and program descriptions in each of the core and elective subject areas offered to FHS students. Detailed information is provided regarding courses that fulfill graduation requirements and those that may be used as exceptions or waivers for some of the specific requirements. In addition, a list and descriptions of our non-departmental support services are included.

Remember, you will choose your path through high school as you explore your passions. Your success depends on your effort and your personal discipline to stay focused on your schoolwork in every class, every day. We look forward to supporting you in your journey through high school!

Our Mission

To graduate students who have achieved academic excellence and who look forward to sharing their expertise, understanding, and compassion to create an increasingly peaceful and productive society.

Our Franklin Tradition and Philosophy

Franklin’s first graduating class walked across the stage in 1912. This year we are celebrating 109 years of graduates who have made amazing contributions to the city, state, and world! Franklin has graduated professional musicians, athletes, authors, governors, doctors, lawyers, inventors, scientists, humanitarians, authors, writers, parents, and so much more. We believe that Franklin’s doors have been opened to everyone and that no matter who you are, where you came from, or what you believe in, all dreams are possible in the Franklin community. We believe that creativity, community service, self-discipline, self-pride, and self-expression are every bit as important as intellectual development. We believe that all students are capable of very powerful learning and productivity. To that end, we offer a broad range of courses that help prepare all students for college and career.

Franklin believes that in order for students to best develop their skills and talents, personalization is key. Working with groups of students and teams of teachers allows students and teachers to know one another much more deeply. This allows us to support each other in our skill and talent development. We believe that all students can partake in a very rigorous course of study in preparation for college, career, and life. Effort is at the root of success. In the following sections, you will see that each of the courses available, prepares students for college, career, and life, and helps students to further their own self-development in the areas of character and civic responsibility. We have carefully developed our program to ensure there are many college preparation courses that ALL students at Franklin have both access to them and support to ensure success. Below is a list of college-level courses at FHS. Nearly every student at FHS will take at least one college-level course while at Franklin. We encourage our students to take advantage of these courses to not only be better prepared for college and career but also to help ease the cost of post-high school education by earning college credits or technical certification while in high school!

College and Career Prep Courses

  • AP English Literature and Composition
  • AP Human Geography (ALL Grade 10)
  • AP American Govt and Economics
  • AP Statistics
  • AP Calculus
  • AP Chemistry
  • AP Environmental Science
  • AP Spanish
  • AP Chinese
  • AP Physics
  • AP Computer Science Principles
  • AP Computer Science
  • UW College in the High School in English and Language Arts
  • College in the High School Math
  • Running Start Courses

Changing a Student’s Schedule

Our Administration builds our academic schedule each year based on student selections. Students will be required to remain in the courses they selected. Schedule changes will only be allowed for the following reasons:

  • student is missing a graduation requirement
  • student is missing the prerequisite for the course
  • teacher determines the student is misplaced
  • other extenuating circumstances approved by administration and

Changes must be made before the 10th day of the semester, written on a schedule change form and may require teacher, parent or administrator permission.

Dropping a Course

  • No student may drop a course if the result is a hole in his/her/their schedule.
    • The principal may grant an exception to this policy in extenuating
  • Seniors who are on track to meet their graduation requirements have the option of late arrival or an early dismissal, eliminating any “holes” in their schedule.

Grade when Dropping a Class

For a student to drop a course without penalty of an “E” grade:

  • The student must do so before the end of the fifth week of the term.
  • The time frames may be extended for extenuating circumstances upon approval by the principal or administrative designee.
  • For changes requested after the first 10 days of instruction in a given semester, due to exceptional circumstances, the student must have written permission that is signed by his/her/their parent/guardian, the teacher, administrator, counselor, and the student before a class can be dropped. The FHS Withdrawal Form can be used for this purpose and can be requested in the Counseling Office or by an administrator. A “W” will be placed on the transcript to show that the student withdrew from a course after 10 days of instruction and before the end of the 5th week of the semester/term.

Teaching Assistants/Office Assistants

Students may be teaching or office assistants during their junior or senior year only. Juniors and seniors intending to register as an assistant would need to first check with their counselor to make sure he/she is proceeding successfully toward graduation.

  • A “Teaching Assistant” earns a “P” grade and .25 credits for one (1) semester of satisfactory performance in the
  • An “Office Assistant” earns a letter grade and .5 credits for one (1) semester of Occupational Education.
  • A maximum of 2.0 credits of TA/Work Experience may count toward the general electives requirements of graduation.

Pass/No Credit Grades

In addition to the procedures outlined in Board Policy G10.00 and Board Procedure H35.04, the following are required:

  • The District Pass/No Credit request form is to be signed at the start of the semester by the teacher, parent, student, and counselor to document that the counselor has advised the student of the potential impact(s) that a pass/no credit may have on college admissions. NCAA and some colleges interpret the “P” grade as the lowest possible passing mark or “D”.
  • The student must be aware that to earn the “P” grade in the Seattle School District, a grade of a “D “or above must be earned.
  • Only one Pass/No Credit grade may be requested per semester and must be requested by the fifth (5th) week of the semester.
  • FHS Policy states that a core course meeting a minimal graduation requirement may not be taken for a Pass/No Credit grade (e.g., third year of math or science). However, a core course that is above-and-beyond the minimal graduation requirement may be taken for Pass/No Credit.

Grade Changes

A grade can only be changed by the teacher of record for that specific course and grade; or by the principal if the cause was a grade calculation error or bias.

A grade change must be documented with a completed and fully signed district “Course/Grade/Credit Change” form. The teacher, counselor, administrator & registrar must sign the form prior to data entry. This must be completed within five weeks after that grading period has ended.

Grade/Credit Replacements

If a student chooses grade replacement for a repeated course, the highest grade received will be counted toward the student’s GPA and credits. The replacement process changes the credit code on the course history report to “R”. The original grade will continue to appear on the student’s transcript and academic history, but the student will not receive credit for the replaced course.

  • The replacement mark must be an improvement over the original mark, and the credit earned in the replacement course must be equal to or greater than the credit previously earned in the
  • Replacement courses may only replace the previously taken course, never courses taken at another academic institution outside of the Seattle School District.

If a student retakes a course and does not choose to have the course replaced a former identical course, the additional course grade and credit will be counted under the “general elective” requirement of 4.0 credits.

Incomplete Grades

A grade marked as “Incomplete” must be changed to a letter grade within six (6) school weeks of the following term. If no letter grade is provided, the grade will automatically become an “E”.

The principal has the discretion to make exceptions for extenuating circumstances. This exception will be kept in the student’s file.

P.E. Waivers

Waivers can be approved for military service, medical, religious, participation in directed athletics, for economic reasons (e.g., student is working to support self or family) or for another good cause.

  • No credit is earned when a PE waiver is approved; students must make up the credit requirement.
  • All PE waivers will be placed in the student’s cumulative file.
  • A PE Waiver form can be found in the Counseling Office.
  • PE waivers submitted for sports participation must be submitted at the completion of the season during the academic year that the student participated in that sport.

Alternative Credit Courses

Equivalency credit can be earned for alternative learning experiences, non-high school courses, online courses, work experience, and challenges (WAC 180-51-110). All alternative credit learning experiences must be pre-approved by an administrator before a student begins such a course.

High school credits may be given for, but not limited to, the following:

  • Planned learning experiences conducted away from the school under the supervision or with the approval of the school and linked to one or more of the state learning goals and related essential academic learning requirements.
  • Work experience on the basis that 180 hours of work experience equals a .5 credit;
  • Post-secondary courses in accredited colleges and universities. In the case of courses taken under the statutory Running Start option under RCW 28A.600.300 through 28A.600.400, the district shall award high school credit pursuant to RCW 28A.230.090
  • National Guard high school career training;
  • Courses in accredited or approved technical colleges;
  • Correspondence courses from accredited colleges and universities or schools approved by the National University Education Association or the Distance Education and Training Council;
  • Online courses meeting standards which shall be adopted by written policy by the school district, or standards adopted by the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges, or the Distance Education and Training Council, or the Commission for International and Trans-regional accreditation;
  • Other courses offered by any school or institution if specifically approved for credit by the district; and
  • Credit based on competency testing, in lieu of enrollment or taking courses, may be granted by the district.
  • Online Courses approved by Seattle Public Schools

Making up a failed required course

If a student failes a required course, he/she/they must retake it or it’s equivalency and pass it in order to graduate. Failed courses may be made up in some alternative programs or approved online options although some running start courses can also qualify.

Administrative approval is required before registering in any non-Franklin courses.

Franklin Graduation Requirements – 24 Credits

Graduation Requirement Checklist 

CoursesClass of 2021 and Beyond
Language Arts4.0 credits– eight semesters (Foundational)
Math3.0 credits – six semesters (Foundational)
Science3.0 credits – six semesters (Foundational)
Social Studies3.0 credits – six semesters (Foundational)
Health0.5 credit – one semester (Foundational)
Physical Ed1.5 credits – three semesters (Foundational)
Career Technical Ed1.0 credit – two semesters (Foundational)
Fine Arts2.0 credits – four semesters (1.0 credit Foundational depending on personalized graduation pathway)
World Language2.0 credits – four semesters (0 credit Foundational depending on personalized graduation pathway)
Electives4.0-7.0 credits – eight-eleven semesters (Depending on personalized graduation pathway)
TOTAL24.0 credits (17.0 Foundational credits required toward graduation)

 Language Arts

Students must complete 4.0 credits of language arts. These include: Intro to Lit & Comp (LA9A/9B), World Lit & Comp (LA10A/10B), Amer. Lit & Comp (LA 11A/11B), and Language Arts 12 (LA12A/12B). There are other LA courses that may be substituted with administration permission.

Mathematics

Students must complete 3.0 credits of math that show 3 years of consecutive course progression. Algebra 1A/B, Geometry A/B, and Algebra 2A/B is an example of this progression. There are also other options for the 3rd year of math.

Science

Students in the class of 2021 and beyond must pass 3.0 credits of lab science. This includes Physics A/Chemistry A, Biology, Physics B/Chemistry B.

Social Studies

  • Students must complete World History 1, AP Human Geography 1,2, US History 11A and 11B, and American Government.
  • Most social studies courses taken at the high school level can substitute for World History I for students who transfer to Franklin after the 9th grade. WA State History can be replaced with a completed state history course from outside of Washington; it can also be waived for students coming to SPS during their 11th or 12th-grade year per WAC 180-51-066.

Physical Ed and Health

Students must complete 3 class requirements of physical education. Waivers for these requirements may be granted for certain specific reasons only. Students must still make up the credits that they would have earned having taken the courses. These reasons and the required documentation are listed on the physical education waiver form. Taking .50 in Family Health is also a graduation requirement.

Career Technical Education

Students must complete 1.0 credit of occupational education from any courses in the family and consumer science education, business education, and career-technology education departments.

Fine Arts

Students must complete 2.0 credits. These classes include any visual, performing arts, and instrumental music classes.

Electives

Students must complete 4.0 elective credits. Any class in a subject area that exceeds the graduation requirement is counted as an elective.


Non-Credit Requirements

✓   High School & Beyond Plan – Students will be required to develop an academic plan for the four years they will be in high school as well as a plan for their first year after high school graduation.

✓   Service Learning – Students must complete 60 hours of service-learning. This work must be documented volunteer hours through a non-profit/school and completed outside of the school day. For students who enter the Seattle Public School District after their 9th-grade year, the service-learning requirement is prorated at 15 hours per

✓   Culminating (Senior) Project – The culminating project, which requires students to research, write, and present, will replace the District’s current ‘research paper’ requirement completed during the senior year.

✓  Meet ELA, Math, and Science Graduation Requirements:  Earn a Certificate of Academic Achievement (CAA) or a Certificate of Individual Achievement (CIA) –


State graduation pathways requirements for ELA and Math

Students must meet graduation requirements by completing one of the following pathways for English Language Arts (ELA) and Math:

  • Pass the state Smarter Balanced assessment in ELA and/or Math.
  • Earn a qualifying score on the SAT or ACT college entrance exams in ELA and/or Math.
  • Pass both semesters of a Bridge to College ELA and/or Math class during Grade 12.
  • Pass a dual-credit course in ELA and/or Math. At FHS, this would mean passing a relevant Running Start 100 level course or a UW in the High School class.
  • Pass AP classes with a C+ grade or higher or earn a score of 3 or higher on the AP exams in qualifying subjects in ELA and/or Math.
  • Students can earn a qualifying score on the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB).
  • Students planning a career in trades can complete a 2.0 credit series of Career and Technical Education (CTE) classes that may lead to workforce entry, apprenticeship, or post-secondary education in a related field.
  • Any combination of ELA and Math options from the list above, such as passing the SBA in ELA and an AP course in Math.

These requirements are subject to change under the direction of the state of Washington

Required SPS High School Credits

  • Language Arts 4.0
  • Math 3.0
  • Science 3.0
  • Social Studies 3.0
  • PE (Health/Fitness) 1.5
  • Occupational Ed 1.0
  • Fine Arts 1.0
  • World Language 2.0
  • Health 0.5
  • Electives 4.0

Four-Year Public/Private College Entrance Requirements/Recommendations

  • Language Arts 4.0
  • Math *(Senior year 1.0 credit of quantitative math) 3.0
  • Science 3.0
  • Social Studies 3.0
  • PE (Health/Fitness) 0.0
  • Occupational Ed 0.0
  • Fine Arts 1.0
  • World Languages 2.0
  • Electives 4.0

*Specifics about entrance to four-year colleges and universities.

Four-year colleges prefer (and highly recommend) “four-in-the-core ”, four years of study in Language Arts, Science, Mathematics, and Social Studies. Some universities recommend that World Language be taken senior year as some Colleges of Arts and Sciences (within universities) require a “third term” of World Language during the first two years of college. Many universities look at these choices as “rigorous” and more competitive in the admissions process.

  • English Four full years of Language Arts are required
  • Mathematics The three years of study should cover algebra, geometry, and second-year algebra at minimum. Pre-Calculus, AP Calculus, or AP Statistics are highly recommended.  Math, engineering, and science majorsFour years of math are strongly recommended
  • Science Three years of lab science are required, including biology, chemistry, and physics. Science or pre-medical science/health majorsFour years of science, including 1 AP science, are strongly recommended
  • Instrumental, Visual, or Performing Arts Currently one year is required at most four-year universities, but theUniversity of California system requires that the year of Arts – or two semesters – besequential. Sequential Arts mean a year of band or choir or theatre; or ceramics and advanced ceramics, piano, and advanced piano, drama, and stage or stage production, etc. 
  • World Language Two to three full years of study must be devoted to a single language. A world language course taken in the 8th grade may satisfy one year of the requirement if taught by a highly qualified/endorsed teacher and if the second-year course is completed in high school.

College Prep Planning Sheet

9th Grade10th Grade11th Grad12th Grade
-Intro to Lit & Comp
-World History I
-Ethnic Studies
-World History II
-Career Connect
-Phys A/Chem A
-Algebra 1 or higher
-World Language or Art
-Personal Fitness/Health
-World Lit & Comp AP
-Human Geo
-Biology 1&2
-Geometry or higher
-World Language or Art
-P.E./Elective/Occ Ed 
-Amer Lit & Comp
-U.S. History I/II
-Chem B/Physics B
-Algebra 2 or higher
-World Language or Art
-P.E./Elective/Occ Ed 
-LA.12
-Amer Gov/SS
-Elective AP
-Science Elective
-Math Elective
-World Language or Art
-P.E/Elective/Occ

9th Grade Cohorts

Each ninth-grade student is assigned to a 9th grade team when entering Franklin High School. That team is composed of a Language Arts, World History, and a Science teacher. Those three teachers share the same group of students. Math courses are individualized depending on what math class was taken in the 8th grade. We feel that this structure allows a student’s entry into Franklin more personal by giving students a common group of teachers. Some features of the program include:

Shared Expectations: Teachers offer common academic and behavioral expectations for all classes. This consistent focus is designed to help the student develop an awareness of his or her responsibilities as a student and as a member of the academic community of Franklin High School. Moreover, teachers have developed common expectations and standards in reading, writing, communication and research skills.

Skill Assessment and Instruction: In order to measure the growth of each student towards graduation requirements, including passing the Smarter Balanced Assessment (SBA), students are given a wide range of assessments. These assessments are used to understand the strengths, assets and needs of each student. When assessments are completed, teachers actively use strategies to help students improve their skills as needed. To do this we use a variety of strategies, including Project Based Learning, Socratic Seminar, and the strategies of Reading Apprenticeship. Student assessment work will be contained in a portfolio that will travel with the student throughout his or her career at Franklin.

Support programs: In order to help our students meet their academic goals, we provide a number of additional supports. We have developed advisory relationships with students, we schedule parent meetings for struggling students, and we run our own after-school tutoring programs. We also seek community mentors for struggling students and have a homework center staffed with tutors four days a week. We also host Saturday Enrichment for additional support.

We are working with you to make your first year at Franklin a success, preparing you for the rest of your high school career.

Subjects9th Grade Cohort Courses
Language ArtsIntro to Lit & Comp 9A/9B
Social StudiesWorld History I & Ethnic Studies World History II
Science Chemistry A/Physics A

 

Additional Required Ninth Grade Courses

  Mathematics
A ninth-grade student’s math placement is based upon their 8th-grade math level, diagnostic test scores, and teacher recommendation.

  Personal Fitness
“Five for Life” is a research-driven, standards-based curriculum designed to teach the principles of health and fitness while continually improving students’ fitness levels. Based on the five components of fitness – cardiovascular endurance, muscle strength, muscle endurance, body composition, and flexibility – it incorporates fitness-related activities and motor-skill development with academic content. Students are taught meaningful fitness concepts and vocabulary which empower them to make healthier choices. Student must pass the Fitness Competency Test at the completion of this course to satisfy a fitness graduation requirement.

  Family Health
This course is designed to cover the physical, social, and emotional determinants of health (also known as the health triangle). Included in this course offering: communicable disease control, first aid, CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation), drug information (awareness), human development, nutrition, mental health, and a basic understanding of what to ask and look for during a doctor’s visit: such as understanding sphygmomanometer readings, EKG readings, and Electroencephalogram readings.

Please see course descriptions for Elective offerings.

10th Grade Cohorts

Each tenth-grade student is assigned to cohort classes for Language Arts and Social Studies. As in ninth grade, both teachers will share the same group of students. All classes are rich in recommended college preparatory course work and career exploration. In addition, students will take other elective courses towards graduation.

All 10th-grade students take the State’s Smarter Balance test in English Language Arts and Math, as one way to fulfill state graduation requirements.

Subjects10th Grade CORE Courses
Language ArtsWorld Literature and Composition 10A and 10B
Social StudiesAP Human Geography I, II
Science Biology A and B
MathPlacement based on previous year’s math course

CORE classes

11th Grade Subjects12th Grade Subjects
American Lit & CompLanguage Arts 12A/B or UW in the HS or AP Eng Lit
Ethnic Studies -USBridge to College English
History 11A/11BAmerican Government
Physics B/Chemistry BScience selection
Math selectionMath selection

Every student at Franklin High School is assigned to a grade-level Advisory class that meets weekly. Each advisory is led by an Advisory Mentor (staff member) who facilitates lessons in Social and Emotional Learning, College and Career Preparation, High School and Beyond Plan and Study/Organization skills. Students will also complete their Student Led Presentations and/or Student Led Conferences that outline their academic and personal goals, academic progress monitoring towards graduation, college and career goals, academic best works, recognition awards and community service, and their positive experiences as a Quaker.

Advisory Mentors remain with the same group of students each year until graduation.

Each student can earn a .25 credit each semester for completing Advisory requirements with a Pass/Fail grade.

Franklin High School has a long-standing proud tradition of rigorous and meaningful Bilingual Services. Our highly qualified staff works with each student individually to ensure proper program placement and individual progress towards full emersion in the general education setting. The ELD department offers sheltered content courses to support transitional bilingual education students, students with English Language Development (ELD) services, until they can move fully into general education classes. Placement into ELD classes depends upon English proficiency as determined by the English Language Proficiency Assessment (ELPA). Students eligible for services assess into one of four numbered levels: 1, 2, 3 or 4. The number of ELD classes assigned depends on the level of English proficiency. Math classes are assigned according to math assessment scores and math courses already taken. Nearly all ELD classes are multi grades, from 9th to 12th grade. All courses incorporate Talking to the Text and other reading strategies.

Multilingual Language Arts

ML LA LEVEL 4
Monitored exit to general education Language Arts.

ML LA LEVEL 3
This course entails a variety of reading genres: short stories, poetry, non-fiction articles, magazine features, biographies, horror, a novel and a non-fiction book. Included are reading strategies, literary analysis, literary techniques, grammar, and essay writing. Main text: Edge Level B, Students will analyze and use the writing process to write five paragraph essays.

ML LA LEVEL 2
This course covers various reading genres, among them short stories, poetry, dramas, fiction and non-fiction excerpts. Grammar focuses on complex sentence structures. Reading strategies are embedded within each unit. Main text: Edge Level A; students will read a novel or a non-fiction book. Students will understand and write multi-paragraph essays.

ML LA LEVEL 1
This course introduces students to genres such as play excerpts, advice columns, short poetry, fables, myths, short stories. Reading strategies reinforce Talking to the Text (T4) techniques. The main text is Edge Fundamentals.

Grammar centers on parts of speech and simple present and past verb tenses. Themes focus on self and one’s relationship to society. Students at this level may be assigned an additional English support class. Students will understand and use the writing process to produce short essays.


ML Mathematics

ML MATH A/B
Grades 
: 9, 10
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit

ML Math is designed for beginning-level, newly-immigrated English Language Learners of high school age. The goals of the course are to develop basic English language proficiency, basic math content knowledge, and introduction to US school culture. Language development is focused on rational numbers and algebra foundations.

ML ALGEBRA 1A/B
Grades:  9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit : Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Algebra 1A/B
Prerequisite: Successful completion of grade 8 mathematics

ML Algebra 1 is a year-long course that provides a practical blend of technology-related and paper-and-pencil problem solving tools. Explorations and investigations emphasize symbol sense, algebraic manipulations, and conceptual understandings. Students make sense of important algebraic concepts, learn and practice essential algebraic skills, and apply algebraic thinking.

ML ALGEBRA 2 A/B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied : Algebra 2A/B
Prerequisite: Completion or concurrent registration in Geometry A/B

Algebra 2A is the first semester of a year-long Algebra 2 course. In this course, students interpret key features of quadratic functions by analyzing equations, graphs, and tables, and use quadratic functions to model situations and solve problems. Students connect prior work with quadratics to understand the parabola as a conic section.

ML ALGEBRA LAB
Grades: 
10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Elective

ML Algebra Lab is a year-long course that supports students through re-teaching of Algebra topics as well as reviewing and enriching basic math concepts to improve understanding of the Algebra 1 curriculum. The purpose of this course is to give students more time and more help in class as much as possible to practice and understand well the essential math concepts in Algebra 1 course.

ML GEOMETRY A/B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Geometry A/B
Prerequisite: Algebra 1 A/B

ML Geometry is a year-long course that provides an opportunity for students to explore geometric relationships with a wide variety of tools, including paper, compasses, computers and graphing calculators. Students perform constructions, measure figures, observe patterns, discuss their findings, write their own definitions, and formulate and prove geometric conjectures. Topics include informal and formal proof, properties of triangles, angles relationship, polygons, and circles, transformations and tessellations, area and volume, the Pythagorean Theorem, congruence and similarity. ML Geometry A provides English Language Learner support to students taking Geometry with English Proficiency Levels of Emerging or Progressing by the ELPA21. Teachers of this course have a math and ML endorsement.

ML FINANCIAL ALGEBRA A/B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: Algebra 1 and Geometry

Designed for students who have completed Algebra 1 and Geometry. This course can serve as the third credit of math for students who elect to take a CTE alternative for the third year requirement through a counselor supported approval process. This course is also appropriate for students who have completed Algebra 2 and want to take a course specifically focusing on the mathematics of personal finance. This course is not equivalent to Algebra 2. Financial Algebra combines algebraic and graphical approaches with practical business and personal finance applications. Students explore algebraic thinking patterns and functions in a financial context.


ML SCIENCE

ML PHYS A / CHEM A
Length/Credit: 
Full Year 1.0 Credit
Requirement Satisfied: Science with Lab

ML Phys A/Chem A is designed for ELL students in grades 9, 10, 11 and 12. This is a class where students learn topics in Physics and Chemistry and related Earth Science topics. English language skills specific to the Sciences are taught as part of the everyday curriculum. The Phys A/Chem A curriculum has been developed to meet the requirements of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the adopted Washington State Science Standards and prepare students for the Washington Comprehensive Assessment of Science (WCAS).


ML SOCIAL STUDIES

ML WASHINGTON STATE
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Year Long 1.0 Credit

ML WORLD HISTORY I/II/III
Grades: 
9, 10, 11
Length/Credit: One Semester .5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: WH I/II/III

ML World History courses are the chronological study of cultures from the earliest origins of mankind to current events/issues. By studying the geography and historical, cultural, political, and economic changes of the peoples in Africa, Asia, the Americas, and Europe, students will gain appreciation of the accomplishments of all people. These courses are aligned with mainstream World History courses.

ML US HISTORY 11A/B
Grades: 
11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Social Studies

ML United States History 11A/B is offered by semester. Each is a selective study of United States history and government, and the development of America as a diverse multi-cultural society. The course content which is organized around topics and themes within a broad chronological framework will be used to help ELL students develop their English language skills. This course is aligned with mainstream US History.

ML AMERICAN GOVERNMENT and ECONOMICS
Grade: 
12
Length/Credit: One Semester .5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: American Government

ML American Government and Economics is offered as a one semester course aligned to mainstream American Government course. The content is focused on the American way of government to include understanding the US Constitution and the Bill of Rights as it applies to individuals and groups. It will also cover the organization of the government in the federal, state, and local levels. This course is designed to help the ELL students understand laws, rules, and regulations and prepare them for civic participation and citizenship.

Special Education Services

The Special Education Department at Franklin High School is comprised of many individualized components. Students and parents work with a designated IEP case manager. Together they write an IEP and design a program that fits the individual student needs that may include class offerings in small group settings with individualized instruction, modified course work within the general education setting, or supports and accommodations in the general education setting.

The Franklin Visual Art Program offers instruction in a wide variety of two- and three-dimensional art media in an environment that honors creativity as well as craft. Flexible coursework is designed to meet the needs of the beginning student as well as the more advanced student. All studio classes emphasize the following “21st Century skills” in regard to art-making: critical thinking, creative thinking, collaboration, perseverance, and growth mindset. Students are expected to develop confidence in creative problem solving, find a diversity of possibilities for assignments, and experience the success of following projects through to completion with the understanding that skills are gained through commitment and practice.

ART SURVEY
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester, 0.5

In this introductory course, students cover a broad range of art concepts, techniques, and media. Study of the Elements of Art and Principles of Design are included in the projects to begin establishing fluency in the language of art. Sketchbooks are used to document the progression of skills acquired, and self-expression. The sketch book contains visual and written entries, including response and reflections on works of art. No previous art experience necessary. All students are welcome. This course may be repeated for credit.

DRAWING AND PAINTING BEGINNING
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester, 0.5

Drawing and Painting Beginning introduces students to the Elements of Art and Principles of Design. Study of these are included in art projects to establish fluency in the language of art. Students create art in a variety of drawing and painting media and explore the relationship between observation, artistic vision, and composition. Students use sketchbooks or other means to develop skills and ideas. Visual Art builds lifelong skills through critical thinking and the creative process. No previous art experience necessary. All students are welcome. This course may be repeated for credit

DRAWING AND PAINTING ADVANCED
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester, 0.5

Drawing and Painting Advanced is intended for students who want to further their knowledge and experience in drawing and painting media. Students in this course continue to create art and explore the relationship between observation, artistic vision, and composition in an advanced setting. Students explore media and ideas with more independence and demonstrate responding and reflecting on their own work and that of others. Students produce a portfolio of work at the end of this course. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements. This course may be repeated for credit.

CERAMICS BEGINNING
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester, 0.5

This beginning course is for students who want to work with their hands and develop ideas in 3-dimensional form. Students work with clay, creating both functional and non-functional art pieces. Students learn the properties of clay, construction methods, glazing techniques and the firing process as core concepts of this course. Students learn about ceramic arts and artists from a variety of contemporary and historical sources and across cultures. No previous art experience necessary. All students are welcome. This course may be repeated for credit.

CERAMICS ADVANCED
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester, 0.5

In this course, students explore Ceramics at a higher level with hand building and wheel methods. Students design and develop works through investigation of techniques and materials through ceramic arts and artists from a variety of contemporary and historical sources across cultures. Assignments are more complex, challenging students to make deeper connections and use voice to communicate ideas. Students have a portfolio of work at the end of the semester. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements. This course may be repeated for credit.

SCULPTURE
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester, 0.5

Students in this course explore, plan, and create 3-dimensional artwork. Students engage in the element of form using a variety of materials such as clay, plaster, wood, and metals. No previous arts experience necessary. All students are welcome. This course may be repeated for credit.

ADVANCED DRAWING & PAINTING: MURALING  9th-period class (after school)
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: One Semester .5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Fine Art
Prerequisite: Teacher’s Approval

This class teaches skills involved in painting murals – scaling, color theory, graphic design, and brushwork. Students will work as a team to design and create actual projects, using the walls of Franklin as its canvas. Students work with various student clubs, faculty, administrators, and other “clients” to create tailored, site-specific projects. Project responsibility skills, like goal-setting and equipment maintenance as well as teamwork and descriptive writing, are emphasized.

THEATRE BEGINNING
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester, 0.5

This introductory course is for all students looking to develop skills in acting and performing in front of others. Public speaking, creative problem solving, and collaboration are explored through creative activities, voice and movement exercises, improvisation, story structure, creating character, and scene study. No previous theatre experience necessary. All students are welcome. This course may be repeated for credit.

THEATRE INTERMEDIATE
Grades
: 9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester, 0.5

This intermediate course explores the art of creating character and commanding the attention of an audience during a performance. The course includes analysis of contemporary and classic scripts, professional blocking and directing, and preparing monologues for auditions. Students utilize self-direction to collaborate in small groups and openness to critical feedback and reflection. This course may be repeated for credit.

THEATRE PLAY PRODUCTION
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester, 0.5

Theatre Play Production prepares students to use the skills and techniques of acting and performance in one or more plays produced for a public audience. This course mirrors professional theatre standards, culminating with a full-scale production of a play. Students may also have opportunities to work in areas of theatre production including directing, scenic design and construction, costuming, properties, stage management, promotions, and publicity. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts requirements. This course may be repeated for credit.

Other requirements: This is a 9th-period class. All rehearsals are after school, evenings, and/or weekends.

MUSICAL THEATRE PRODUCTION
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester, 0.5

Musical Theatre Production prepares students to synthesize the skills and techniques of acting, singing, dancing, and performance into a musical theatre production for a public audience. Throughout this process students develop community by working as an ensemble. This course mirrors professional theatre standards, culminating in a full-scale production of a musical. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts requirements. This course may be repeated for credit.

Other requirementsThis is a 9th-period class. All rehearsals are after school, evenings, and/or weekends .

DANCE PERFORMANCE BEGINNING/INTERMEDIATE
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: One Semester .5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Fine Art

Students will learn, create, and design dance numbers for the stage. Multiple genres and styles will be employed from modern, jazz, urban, line-dancing, and ballroom, to hip hop and break dancing. This is a performance-based class. Students will perform multiple numbers on stage for a live audience as their culminating project.

TECHNICAL THEATRE BEGINNING
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester, 0.5

Technical Theatre Beginning is a production-oriented course that provides foundational stagecraft skills and safety procedures preparing students for industry and college study of technical theatre. Students engage in scenic design and construction, lighting, sound, properties, costumes, make-up, special effects, theatre management, stage management,

and theatre terminology. Technical Theatre Beginning is offered as a CTE course, CTE course cross-credited for Fine Arts, and a Fine Arts course. This course may be repeated for credit. Other requirements: This class is an 8th period class and will have some evening and/or Saturday requirements during the two months closest to the production of the show.

The Franklin Visual Art Program offers instruction in a wide variety of two- and three-dimensional art media in an environment that honors creativity as well as craft. Flexible coursework is designed to meet the needs of the beginning student as well as the more advanced student. All studio classes emphasize the following “21st Century skills” in regard to art-making: critical thinking, creative thinking, collaboration, perseverance, and growth mindset. Students are expected to develop confidence in creative problem solving, find a diversity of possibilities for assignments, and experience the success of following projects through to completion with the understanding that skills are gained through commitment and practice.

Performing ensembles (Quaker Band and Orchestra) will require extended rehearsal and performance times outside of the school day.

SYMPHONIC BAND A & B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Year-long, 1.0
Prerequisite: 1 previous year in band

This year-long performing ensemble is designed for advanced students who play traditional woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments. Students develop skills in tone production, phrasing, rhythmic and aural acuity, advanced technical skills associated with one’s instrument, and correct posture. Band students learn and perform a wide variety of music from different cultures and time periods. Students perform in school concerts, regional festivals, and athletic events. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements. This course may be repeated for credit.

NOTE: There are concerts that are part of the grade for this class. ATTENDANCE AT ALL PERFORMANCES IS REQUIRED.

SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA A & B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Year-long, 1.0
Prerequisite: 1 previous year in orchestra

This year-long performing ensemble is for advanced students of String, Wind, Brass, and Percussion instruments. Orchestra students play a wide variety of music from different cultures and time periods and perform in school concerts and regional festivals. Students develop advanced skills in tone production, phrasing, rhythmic and aural acuity, and the advancement of technical skills. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements. This course may be repeated for credit.

CONCERT CHOIR A & B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Year-long, 1.0 credit

Students in this year-long course participate in an intermediate to advanced choral performing ensemble that performs quality choral literature from a variety of genres and cultures. Students learn vocal technique and musicianship skills. Students perform in school concerts and regional festivals. Students may receive CTE credit after fulfilling all Fine Arts credit requirements. This course may be repeated for credit.

PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE A (DRUMLINE)
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester, 0.5 credit
Prerequisite: 1 previous year in any music class

This semester course ensemble is intended for students who are interested in playing pitched and non-pitched percussion instruments in a cohesive performing ensemble. Students learn and perform a wide variety of music from different cultures and time periods and perform in school concerts and regional festivals. This course may be repeated for credit.

PIANO LAB 1
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester, 0.5 credit

Students in this course learn to play the piano. Students in the piano class will learn the necessary skills and concepts to gain a foundational proficiency on the piano keyboard. This is a one-semester class. This course may be repeated for credit.

GUITAR LAB 1
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester, 0.5 credit

Students in this course will learn the necessary skills and concepts to gain a foundational proficiency on guitar and music- reading. This is a one-semester class. This course may be repeated for credit.

Language Arts

INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE & COMPOSITION 9 A/B
Grade: 9
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: LA 9 A/B, Honors Option

This course emphasizes reading and composition, with special attention paid to helping ninth-graders plan, organize, and develop study skills necessary for high school success. The study of grammar, spelling, vocabulary, and literature, as well as participation in speaking and listening activities, are included. The six writing traits (organization, ideas, voice, sentence fluency, word use, and conventions) are introduced. The achievement of Washington State Standards is a focus.

WORLD LITERATURE & COMPOSITION 10 A/B
Grade: 10
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: LA 10 A/B, Honors Option

This course emphasizes appreciation of the literary heritage of many cultures by focusing on several literary genres, including short stories, nonfiction, essays, novels, poetry, speeches, and drama. This course reinforces earlier reading, writing, and communication performance skills, and helps tenth-grade students to meet Washington State Standards. The six writing traits (organization, ideas, voice, sentence fluency, word use, and conventions) are stressed. Students are prepared for the SBAC exams, given to tenth graders in the spring.

ETHNIC STUDIES AMERICAN LITERATURE 11A/B
Grade: 11
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: LA 11 A/B, Honors Option

This course will enable students to meet core ELA requirements for graduation by learning critical skills, content, and perspectives of people and communities of Color and tribal sovereignty.

AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE A/B
Grades: 11
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: LA 11

Students will read, discuss, and write about essays, novels, poetry, short stories, and plays written by African-American authors. This course will emphasize the rich contribution to American society made by African-American writers. The course objectives are based on the ten principles of BLM and focus on developing students’ critical reading, writing, and thinking skills.

LATINX AMERICAN LITERATURE A/B
Grades: 11
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: LA 11

In this course, students will read, discuss, and write about novels, poetry, short stories, and plays written by LatinX American authors. This course will emphasize the rich contribution to American society made by LatinX writers. This course satisfies the 11th grade ELA graduation requirement.

ASIAN AMERICAN LITERATURE A/B
Grades: 11
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: LA 11

In this course, students will read, discuss, and write about novels, poetry, short stories, and plays written by Asian American authors. This course will emphasize the rich contribution to American society made by Asian writers. This course satisfies the 11th grade ELA graduation requirement.

NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE A/B
Grades: 11
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: LA 11

Native American Literature is designed to expose students to a literary anthology of the Native American. Students will read novels, short stories, poetry, and personal narratives that emerge from the American indigenous voice. They will seek to discover the important contributions the Native American has made to the American culture. In response to readings, they will write analytical responses, craft personal reflections, and engage in thoughtful discussion. Students may have to purchase some books.

UW ENGLISH 131
Grade: 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: LA 12A/B

UW 131 is a 5-credit writing-intensive course offered through theUniversity of Washington in the High School program. The course is dual credit for both high school and college credit. English 131 is one of the more popular writing courses offered and covers requirements for many majors. This is a portfolio class wherein students create a portfolio that is reflective of their ability to “…write papers with complex claims that matter in academic contexts.” The readings in this class are challenging and focus on academic discourse from multiple genres and disciplines. Offered first semester only.

UW ENGLISH COMPARATIVE LIT 240
Grade: 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: LA 12A/B

UW 240 -“Margins and Centers: Who’s In, Who’s Out, and Why That Matters for All of Us” – is a second-semester dual credit course associated with theUniversity of Washington in the High School, which allows high school students the opportunity to take UW classes and earn UW credit while still attending Franklin. This particular class emphasizes literature that helps us think about how we label one another based on various social and biological features such as, gender, race, ethnicity, socio-economic status, language, citizenship status, sexuality, and ability. All societies experience this to some degree, wherein some are part of the Center –often with position and the power to create and enforce policy—while others are relegated to the Margin –with less power and the expectation to adhere to the rules and regulations dictated by the Center. For one semester, we explore these two separate and unequal worlds and address how the individual roles of identity, power, and privilege play into them. Offered second semester only.

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION
Grade: 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: LA 12A/B

This is a course for students willing to undertake college-level work. This course emphasizes the intensive study of major literary works and the writing of critical analyses and expository compositions, developing students’ critical reading, writing, and thinking skills. In the fall students receive guidance in their college search and produce a polished college essay, as well as begin the Author Project, which counts toward the Senior Project. Students are required to take both semesters of this course .

BRIDGE TO COLLEGE ENGLISH A/B
Grades: 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit

Bridge to College English Language Arts (ELA) is a year-long course ELA course for seniors who are using this transition course as a graduation pathway. Students must earn 1.0 credit in Bridge to College ELA to fulfill the pathway requirement and also counts as a student’s LA 12 class. The class focuses on the English language arts key readiness standards from Washington State’s K-12 Learning Standards for English language arts. The course is designed to prepare students for entrance into post-secondary credit-bearing courses. Students who earn a grade of “B” or better will be granted automatic placement into English 101 at all participating Washington higher education institutions. 

LGBTQIA AMERICAN LITERATURE A/B
Grades: 11
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: LA 11

This is a semester long Language Arts elective course based on standards contained in the Washington State Common Core Standards. It is designed to enable high school students to sharpen academic reading and writing skills in preparation for college, career and life. This course will focus on improving reading comprehension through skill development, increasing understanding of narrative and expository text structures, including academic reading, functional reading, informational reading and technical reading, in order to learn more effectively from subject-matter textbooks in Science, History/Social Studies, Math and English. Students will be introduced to narrative and expository organizational patterns, as well as the academic language used, and the integration of reading and writing in the aforementioned classes. Frequent progress monitoring is implemented to ensure growth and acceleration. Content covered in this course is based upon student needs, and teachers select the appropriate materials. Students may continue this course beyond the first semester (i.e. COLLEGE PREP LITERACY 1B, 2A, 2B).

COLLEGE PREP LITERACY A/B
Grades: 11
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 Credit

This is a semester long Language Arts elective course based on standards contained in the Washington State Common Core Standards. It is designed to enable high school students to sharpen academic reading and writing skills in preparation for college, career, and life. This course will focus on improving reading comprehension through skill development, increasing understanding of narrative and expository text structures, including academic reading, functional reading, informational reading and technical reading, in order to learn more effectively from subject-matter textbooks in Science, History/Social Studies, Math and English. Students will be introduced to narrative and expository organizational patterns, as well as the academic language used, and the integration of reading and writing in the aforementioned classes. Frequent progress monitoring is implemented to ensure growth and acceleration. Content covered in this course is based upon student needs, and teachers select the appropriate materials. Students may continue this course beyond the first semester (i.e. COLLEGE PREP LITERACY 1B, 2A, 2B).

Mathematics

ALGEBRA 1A/B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Algebra 1A/B

The purpose of this course is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. In this course, students begin with evaluating and simplifying expressions, solving, and justifying steps using Algebraic properties. Linear, exponential, and quadratic relationships are also extended by contrasting them with each other. Multiple representations and fluency to translate between the differing representations are modeled using real-life situations.

ALGEBRA 1 LAB
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Elective
Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Algebra 1A/B

Algebra Lab is a yearlong or semester elective course designed to provide intensive support to students concurrently enrolled in Algebra 1A/B. This course will help students build their conceptual understanding of algebra content while practicing necessary fundamental mathematics skills. This course will reinforce what is taught in the students’ Algebra 1 A/B course described above. Students may elect to enroll in Algebra 1 Lab or may be recommended or assigned by teachers, counselors, or other school personnel.

GEOMETRY A/B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 Credit
Requirement Satisfied: Geometry A/B, Honors option
Prerequisite: Algebra 1 A/B

Students formalize their understanding of angle relationships and triangle properties. Students use geometric transformations and formal constructions to study congruence and similarity. Students develop formal proofs of angle and triangle properties and relationships using precise language and notation. 

ALGEBRA 2 A/B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 Credit
Requirement Satisfied: Algebra 2A/B, Honors Option 
Prerequisite: Completion or concurrent registration in Geometry A/B

In this course, students model and analyze real-world and mathematical situations using polynomial, radical, exponential, logarithmic, functions and equations, interpret categorical and quantitative data to make inferences, and justify conclusions based on statistical simulations, studies, surveys, and experiments.

BRIDGE TO COLLEGE MATH A/B
Grades: 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Math
Prerequisite: attempt Alg 2

The Bridge to College Mathematics course is a year-long math course for seniors who are using this transition course as a graduation pathway. Students must earn 1.0 credit in Bridge to College Math with a D or higher to fulfill the pathway requirement. In addition, students who earn a B or better in both semesters of the Bridge course are eligible to enter credit-bearing course work in any of the State of Washington Community and Technical Colleges. The Bridge to College Mathematics course focuses on the key readiness standards from the Washington State Mathematics K-12 Learning Standards as well as the eight Standards of Mathematical Practices needed for students to be ready to undertake post secondary academic or career preparation in non-STEM fields or majors.

AP CALCULUS AB A
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Math
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus A/B or Pre-Calculus A/B Honors

AP Calculus AB A is designed to be the equivalent of the first half of a one-semester college calculus course and prepares students to take the AP Calculus AB Exam in May. AP Calculus AB A has an Advanced Placement designation and qualifies for an extra 1.0 GPA quality point. In this course, students build on prior knowledge to understand the concept of a limit.

AP CALCULUS AB B
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester, .5
Requirement Satisfied: Math
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus A/B or Pre-Calculus A/B Honors

AP Calculus AB B is designed to be the equivalent of the second half of a one-semester college calculus course and prepares students to take the AP Calculus AB Exam in May. AP Calculus AB B has an Advanced Placement designation and qualifies for an extra 1.0 GPA quality point. In this course, students develop the understanding of an integral through approximation of area and accumulation of change. Students apply the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus to integrate functions. Students study and learn to solve differential equations. Students consider the applications of integration to find area under a curve and volumes of 3-dimensional solids.

AP STATISTICS A
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Math
Prerequisite: Algebra2 A/B or higher

AP Statistics A is designed to be the equivalent of the first half of a one-semester college statistics course and prepares students to take the AP Statistics Exam in May. Students learn how to collect, display and describe data. Students deepen their understanding of probability as it pertains to the role of randomness in data gathering.

AP STATISTICS B
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Math
Prerequisite: Algebra2 A/B or higher

AP Statistics B is designed to be the equivalent of the second half of a one-semester college statistics course and prepares students to take the AP Statistics Exam in May. Students learn to draw conclusions about populations based on the results of a single sample by creating confidence intervals to estimate population values, and conducting hypothesis tests to make decisions. 

MATH 141/PRE-CALCULUS A
Grades: 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Math
Prerequisite: Alg 2

In this College in the High School course, students model and analyze real-world and mathematical situations using piece-wise, absolute value, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, rational, and trigonometric functions. Students extend their understanding of these functions through the study of their inverses, reciprocals, and composition of functions. This course is designed to be the equivalent of the first half of a one-semester college Precalculus course. In order to register for college credits, students must earn a A- or higher in Algebra 2 Honors, score 25 or higher on the ACT, score 580 on the SAT, or score 4 on the Smarter Balance Math Test. Students can also take a placement test with Edmonds College to place into this course.

MATH 142/PRE-CALCULUS B
Grades: 11, 12
Length/Credit : Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Math
Prerequisite: Pre-calculus A

In this College in the High School course, students apply trigonometric and triangle relationships to prove trig identities. Students use matrices as a tool to solve systems and vectors to model Physics applications. Students represent conic sections algebraically and graphically. Students extend their understanding of probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions.

MATH 107A (MATHEMATICS IN SOCIETY) – COLLEGE IN THE HIGH SCHOOL
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Algebra 2
Requirement Satisfied: Math

This is the 1st semester of a year-long College in the High School course that introduces math topics used in a variety of liberal arts disciplines, such as mathematical modeling, representational statistics, probability, and finance math.

Math 107B (MATHEMATICS IN SOCIETY) – COLLEGE IN THE HIGH SCHOOL
Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Algebra 2
Requirement Satisfied: Math

This is the 2nd semester of a year-long College in the High School course that introduces math topics used in a variety of liberal arts disciplines, such as mathematical modeling, representational statistics, probability, and finance math.

Physical and Health Education

Students will increase their knowledge of their bodies and how they function while participating in vigorous physical activity. An understanding of good health, daily exercise, and an appreciation of a sound diet as part of a healthy lifestyle are taught. Students will be encouraged to compete with themselves, not each other while improving their skills. Each unit taught requires full participation, skills testing, and written exams. Our department will work hard to fulfill all mandated ‘Seattle School District’ requirements, including the ‘Presidential Youth Physical Fitness Program. Parents are welcome and encouraged to take an active part in their child’s education by visiting classes.

PERSONAL FITNESS
Grade 9
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Physical Education & PE Comp. Test

“Five for Life” is a research-driven, standards-based curriculum designed to teach the principles of health and fitness while continually improved students’ fitness levels. Based on the five components of fitness – cardiovascular endurance, muscle strength, muscle endurance, body composition, and flexibility – it incorporates fitness-related activities and motor-skill development with academic content. Students are taught meaningful fitness concepts and vocabulary which empower them to make healthier choices.

CONDITIONING AND WEIGHT TRAINING
Grades 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Physical Education

This course is offered to students desiring to develop or maintain a high level of fitness, and/or to provide activity and diet information for effective weight control. Weight training and conditioning includes running, the use of Universal weights, and basic weight training equipment.

ADVANCED WEIGHT TRAINING
Grades 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Physical Education

Prerequisite: Conditioning and Weight Training This course is offered to those students who have attained a higher degree of fitness and strength, and have demonstrated the knowledge in using Universal and free weights.

INDIVIDUAL SPORTS
Grades 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Physical Education

This course offers continued development of skills in traditional individual sports from beginning to advance. Skills will be taught and developed with emphasis places on daily improvement with physical activity becoming part of a lifelong learning routine. Cooperation and teamwork are essential when competing in advanced classes.

TEAM SPORTS (Basketball/Fitness/Football/Soccer/Softball)
Grades 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Physical Education

This course offers continued development of skills in traditional sports from beginning to advanced. Skills will be taught and developed with emphasis placed on daily improvement with physical activity becoming part of a life-long learning routine. Cooperation and teamwork are essential when competing in advanced classes. Competition is sometimes fierce and it is important that students learn to work together.

The Science Department offers courses designed to promote strong foundations in science, scientific literacy, and to develop habits of scientific thinking. Three years (6 semesters) of science are required for Washington State high school graduation for the class of 2021 and beyond (previously two years). The core science classes have been developed to meet the requirements of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the adopted Washington State Science Standards, and prepare students for the Washington Comprehensive Assessment of Science (WCAS) in the spring of their 11th-grade year. Electives are available in the 12th-grade year based on student interests and anticipated future studies. In addition to the core science course in 11th grade, electives are available to 11th-grade students if space in the course is available. All science courses are lab sciences and meet SPS lab science requirements.

PHYSICS A/CHEMISTRY A
Grades: 9
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Science with Lab, Honors Option

This course is organized into two-semester courses. Each unit is grounded in a Phenomenon that students work to explain using the evidence they collect throughout the unit. Semester 1: Physics A primarily focuses on the Science and Engineering Practices – Developing Models, Arguing with Evidence, and Scientific Explanations. Physics A includes 3 units: Charge, Waves, and Magnetism. In this course, students will study static electricity and current electricity, conservation of energy, energy transfer, magnetism, wavelength and frequency, and light and sound waves. Students will refine their science and engineering skills within the context of an engaging storyline to explain a phenomenon. Semester 2: Chemistry A includes 4 units: Atomic Structure, Ionic Bonding and Conductivity, Covalent Bonding and Intermolecular Forces, and Nuclear Science. Chemistry A continues to build the foundation for the Science and Engineering Practices (SEP).

BIOLOGY A/B
Grade: 10
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Science with Lab

This course is organized into two semesters. Semester 1: Biology A: Tracing matter and energy in living systems. Students will study the use and formation of carbon-based molecules, organization of multicellular organisms, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, aerobic and anaerobic conditions, ecosystems, carbon cycling impacts of human activity, energy resources, and global climate change. Semester 2: Biology B: Tracing information in living systems. Students will study development, mitosis, homeostasis, genetic variation, inheritance, population genetics, evolution, natural selection, and adaptation, as well as Earth’s formation, geologic history, biodiversity, and impacts of human activity. Students will refine their science and engineering skills within the context of an engaging storyline to explain a phenomenon.

PHYSICS B/CHEMISTRY B
Grades: 11
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Science with Lab

This course is organized into two semesters. The semesters may be taken in either order. Physics B: Mechanics in the Earth and Solar System. Students will study energy changes and flow, the energy associated with motion and relative position, conversion between forms of energy, the formation of continental and ocean-floor features, cycling of matter, Newton’s Second Law of motion, conservation of momentum, collisions, the relationship between electric currents and magnetic fields, and motion of orbiting objects. Chemistry B: Reactions, Energy, and Environmental Chemistry. Students will study energy flow in a chemical reaction, factors affecting reaction rate, conditions affecting the production of a reaction, mass conservation, second law of thermodynamics, changes to earth’s systems, the effect of energy flow on climate, properties of water, climate change, and impacts of human activity. Students will refine their science and engineering skills within the context of an engaging story line to explain a phenomenon.

ASTRONOMY
Grades: 12 (11 based on space available)
Length/Credit: One Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Science with Lab/Elective

In this course, students will encounter objects from across the universe that will ignite tremendous wonderment and excitement for science! Astronomy will explore everything from our world’s location in the sky to such unfamiliar and mysterious objects as black holes and exploding stars. No mere fact-finding mission, the class will focus on the practices by which astronomers understand what lies beyond Earth. Exposure to the astronomical process is accomplished through modeling and is aligned with NGSS science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas. The course is organized into unit driving questions that include multiple phenomena that engage students in the development of an explanatory model.

ANATOMY/PHYSIOLOGY
Grades
: 12 (11 based on space available)
Length/Credit : One Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Science with Lab/Elective

This course will begin with human anatomy and human physiology and continue with comparative anatomy and physiology. Students will compare and contrast the specialized structural and functional systems that regulate human growth and development to maintain health.

AP CHEMISTRY
Grades: 12 (11 based on space available)
Length/Credit: Full year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Science with Lab/Elective
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Algebra 2 or higher AND successful completion of Chemistry B.

The AP Chemistry course provides students with a college-level foundation to support future advances course work in chemistry. Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry through inquiry-based investigations, as they explore topics such as atomic structure, inter molecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium.

AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
Grades: 12 (11 based on space available)
Length/Credit: Full year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Science with Lab/Elective

Recommendations: Concurrent enrollment in Algebra 2 or higher. Successful completion of Chemistry B is strongly encouraged.

The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college course in environmental science, through which students engage with scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world. The course requires that students identify and analyze natural and human-made environmental problems, evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental Science is interdisciplinary, embracing topics from geology, biology, environmental studies, environmental science, chemistry, and geography. There is also an emphasis on global climate change and environmental justice.

AP PHYSICS 1
Grades: 12 (11 based on space available)
Length/Credit: Full year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Science with Lab/Elective

Recommendations: Concurrent enrollment in Algebra 2 or higher.

AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based lab science, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understating of physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore these topics: kinematics; dynamics; circular motion and gravitations; energy-momentum; simple harmonic motion; torque and rotational motion; electric charge and electric force; DC circuits; and mechanical waves and sound.

Social Studies are the integrated study of the social sciences and humanities to promote civic competence. Within the school program, social studies provide coordinated, systematic study drawing upon such disciplines as anthropology, archaeology, economics, geography, history, law, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, and sociology as well as appropriate content from the humanities, mathematics, and natural sciences. The primary purpose of social studies is to help young people develop the ability to make informed and reasoned decisions for the public good as citizens of a culturally diverse, democratic society in an interdependent world.

WORLD HISTORY I/II
Grades
: 9
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 Credit
Requirement Satisfied: World History I, Honors Option

In 9th grade, students apply their deeper understanding of social studies concepts on a global scale. The context for this is modern world history, 1450 to the present. Students explore major themes and developments that shaped the modern world, including human rights, revolution, and democracy, to develop an understanding of the roots of current world issues. Students also consider more deeply the role of economics in shaping world events. We take a global approach to the study of world history by exploring the inter-regional connections and global themes that connect our world today. Just as a filmmaker uses multiple lenses to tell a story, our curriculum invites students to begin with a wide-angle view to examine eras in world history and then zoom in to understand the development of events and interactions among people and cultures of today.

AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY I/II
Grades
10
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 Credit
Requirement Satisfied: Social Studies Requirement

The Human Geography course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications.

ETHNIC STUDIES US HISTORY 11A/B
Grades:
11
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit Honors Option

This course will enable students to meet core Social Studies requirements for graduation by learning critical skills, content, and perspectives of people and communities of Color and tribal sovereignties.

LAW AND SOCIETY 1
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit

This course examines how our system of law and our legal institutions work. The student will be able to apply social studies skills. The student will be able to show knowledge of significant persons, groups, places, and events. The student will be able to show understanding of significant vocabulary and concepts.

LAW AND SOCIETY 2
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit

Law and Society 2 will build upon the basic legal foundations learned in Law and Society 1. The course begins with a brief review of the fundamentals covered and then proceeds to an intensive study of both substantive and procedural criminal law, including the defenses to crime.

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
Grades: 12 
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: American Govt/Culminating Project

This one-semester course surveys the American political system and captures some of the dynamics and drama involved in political decision-making. Students explore the founding principles of the United States government within the context of today’s media, voting and elections, and the criminal justice system. Students will study and debate current issues and understand legal precedent. Students leave the course recognizing the complexity of our political world, but more importantly how to analyze and engage that world to produce practical results that reflect their hopes and dreams for America in the 21st century.

AP PROJECT-BASED AMERICAN GOVERNMENT
Grades: 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: American Government/Culminating Project

The Advanced Placement Government course is a project-based, hands-on, and minds-on AP course. This course provides students multiple opportunities to develop an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States, to develop civic commitment and capacity, and to build a well-informed, thoughtful response to the question: What is the proper role of government in our democracy?

ASB LEADERSHIP CLASS
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Elective credit
Prerequisite: Elected to ASB/Class Officer

The ASB Leadership class is intended for elected representatives of the Franklin High School Associated Student Body. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to: demonstrate the ability to communicate within the ASB and the school at- large, apply proper procedures for leading meetings, apply proper procedures for fundraising and managing organizational finances, develop effective project management skills, and demonstrate their ability to coordinate service projects. Students are expected to complete 25 hours of community service per quarter in addition to the work that they complete in class.

Career and Technology Education

Technology Education prepares youth for the world in which they live. Experiences are provided that uncover, develop, release, and realize individual potential. Because the world culture is distinctly characterized as technological, it becomes the function of the schools to give every student insight and understanding of the technological nature of the culture.

BUSINESS EDUCATION
Business Education courses will educate students about business and technology. The students will be provided the opportunity to exercise their learning experiences and further develop positive attitudes. The skills developed will positively empower the students to become productive citizens in the workforce.

Business Education also provides training for college-bound students interested in furthering their business education, while sharpening their technology skills. Business Education provides for personal vocational and post-secondary study. The courses should be an integral part of each student’s comprehensive education.

ACCOUNTING I
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Occupational Education

Accounting I provides an overview of the complete accounting process. Students work through the accounting cycle, first in a service business for a sole proprietorship, and then in a merchandising business for a partnership. Financial statements are prepared. A business simulation set is used to enable students to combine all basic accounting practices in one specific business. Students are permitted to work at their own rate of progress after they have learned the basic fundamentals.

ACCOUNTING II
Grades: 9, 10, 11 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Occupational Education
Prerequisite : Accounting I

In Accounting II, students continue to study the bookkeeping cycle and the interpretation of financial statements. You will study accounting systems for special businesses, payroll records, sales taxes, income taxes, bad debts, depreciation, notes, interest, and accruals. The use of automated accounting systems is introduced as well as an introduction to corporate accounting.

College credits (TECHPREP) are available for students who achieve a B grade or above in both Accounting I and Accounting II and who demonstrate competencies required by the Seattle Public Schools and Seattle Community College Articulation Agreement.

INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Occupational Education

Gain success for your future by exploring the world of business, money marketing, management and entrepreneurship! In this dynamic course, you will explore how successful companies function, practice ethical leadership and learn to make smart financial decisions. Topics include international trade, advertising, marketing, management, the stock market, investment, business climates, economic trends, banking, and technology’s impact on global business. You will learn to speak with confidence and be an educated consumer in today’s global business world.

BUSINESS LAW
Grades: 
10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Occupational Education and Social Studies elective

Business Law studies legal principles and practices applied to business situations and transactions. The topics covered are of importance to all citizens, not just businesspeople. Laws of contracts are basic to business law including contracts of employment, sales, property, insurance, sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporation skills, the course will explore essential questions about communication, technology, creativity, and freedom of expression. Students will be encouraged to discover what they want to communicate, and the best ways to express themselves.

PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE
Grades: 11
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Occupational Education

Principles of Finance is the first-course students take in the Academy of Finance. Students learn about the concepts, tools, and institutions of finance and the course serves as a foundation for the Academy of Finance. Principles of Finance begins with the basics of financial literacy and the function of finance in society. Students will then focus on income, wealth, budgeting, personal finance, personal banking, credit, borrowing, planning for retirement, the role of finance in organizations, how businesses raise capital, initial public offerings (IPOs), selling stocks and bonds, short and long term financing, time value of money, risk management, taxes, business ethics, and technological and international innovations that have changed the financial services field.

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Grades: 
Length/Credit: Yearlong
Requirement Satisfied: Occupational Education

Business Management provides a comprehensive understanding of the processes and activities involved in business. The course provides core content applicable to all aspects of business and encompasses the practical applications of management theory. Students will be introduced to the fundamental management functions including planning, organizing, leading and controlling from multiple perspectives. Including the use of technology and communication as tools of business. The course is designed with a skills-based approach and focuses on six major units: 1. Managing and management responsibilities 2. The environment of business management 3. Business organization and management 4. Financial management 5. Production and marketing management 6. Human resources management

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A1, A2
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Occupational Education

AP Computer Science (CS) A1 covers the fundamentals of CS taught in a first-semester college-level course. Students will be able to demonstrate their ability to design, write, analyze, and document programs and sub-programs. The overall goal for designing a computer program is to solve a given problem. Students will be able to specify and design a program that is understandable, adaptable to changing circumstances, and has the potential to be reused in whole or in part meanwhile thoroughly understanding the problem to be solved.

PROJECTS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 1,2
Grades: 
10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Occupational Education
Prerequisite: AP Computer Science

Projects in Computer Science 1 will provide an opportunity for students who have taken AP Computer Science to undertake a semester-long software development project under the supervision of the course instructor and local computing professionals. The first half of this course will focus on software engineering and project management strategies and standard data structures and algorithms. As students create their products, they will be responsible for writing documentation and verifying correctness.

INTRO TO MEDICAL CAREERS
Grades: 9, 10
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit

The Intro to Medical Careers course integrates the National Health Science Standards as the core foundation of this course. The course focuses on the interrelationships of career exploration and foundation skills necessary for a career in the Healthcare field. Topics include History and Trends of Healthcare, Personal and Professional Qualities of a Healthcare Worker, Legal and Ethical Responsibilities, Emergency Care, Infection Control, Medical Math, Wellness and Nutrition, Client Status, and Medical Terminology. Students apply 21st Century skills and utilize student leadership activities to assess learning.

INTRO TO MEDIA ARTS
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit

An introduction for students interested in exploring production techniques associated with graphic arts, web, photography, animation and videography. Students will work individually and in groups to create a wide variety of projects demonstrating their achievements in understanding processes of the media used and creative techniques for future application in school, business or personal use.

INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Completed Algebra I

Introduction to Computer Science also known as Creative Computing is a preparatory class in the formal study of computer science and its role in the global world.

INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Occupational Education/or Fine Art

This class is designed for students who are interested in Engineering with an emphasis in design. Topics covered include theory and practice in graphical representation and visualization of three-dimensional objects; descriptive geometry; orthographic projection or principal and auxiliary views; sections; pictorials; development and dimensioning theory; includes an introduction to parametric solid modeling using Inventor and/or AutoCAD. Students will complete design projects individually and in groups.

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Prerequisite: Intro. To Engineering
Requirement Satisfied: Occupational Education (Or Science elective – grades 11, 12)

This class is designed for students who are interested in Engineering with an emphasis on the underlying principles. The class progresses through basic mechanics, dynamics, thermodynamics, fluids, statics, materials science, electricity, control systems, computer programming, and robotics. Students completing this course will have learned many of the fundamentals that are covered in the first year of a University engineering program.

VIDEO BEGINNING A & B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit or Year-long, 1.0 credit

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of creatively and effectively communicating visual stories through the lens of a video camera, including critical media analysis. Students collaborate while learning the video production process: pre-production (planning, developing ideas, and identifying resources), production (lighting, composition, and audio recording techniques), and post-production (editing with graphics, sound, and visual effects). Types of productions may include narrative, documentary, news, informational, and experimental. This course may be cross-credited for Fine Arts.

VIDEO ADVANCED A & B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester .5 credit or Year-long, 1.0 credit

This is a hands-on, project-based course in which students work in teams to produce a variety of increasingly complex productions. Students refine their understanding of the production process, incorporating more advanced techniques in development, shooting, sound, lighting, editing, graphics, and special effects. This course may be cross-credited for Fine Arts. This course may be repeated for credit.

PHOTOGRAPHY BEGINNING
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit

Photography Beginning is designed to explore photography as a method of creative visual communication. Students in this course learn basic camera operations and principles of photography such as photo composition, lighting, exposure, and editing. This course may be cross-credited for Fine Arts.

PHOTOGRAPHY ADVANCED
Grades: 
10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit

Photography Advanced is designed for students interested in expressing their personal creative vision through photography. Students in this course develop their own ideas through open-ended assignments and explore photography as a potential career pathway. This course may be cross-credited for Fine Arts. This course may be repeated for credit.

YEARBOOK
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: .5 Occupational Ed/Elective/LA Elective
Prerequisite: Approval by the Yearbook Adviser, Ms. Rice, in room 111

This course requires an interest in organizing, editing, creating content, computers, and photography, and it develops an understanding of print media in general. The yearbook class helps students develop research and interviewing skills, as well as clear and concise writing of news stories, feature stories, and editorials. Cooperation, leadership, and responsibility will be emphasized and expected. Students will complete all activities necessary to plan, publish and sell the school’s yearbook in two semesters.

WOOD TECHNOLOGIES 1 or 2
Grades
: 9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: One Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Occupational Education

Classes will be offered to emphasize both shop work and basic home construction techniques. The shop classes will be used to develop basic wood working skills and safety awareness.

ADVANCED WOOD TECHNOLOGIES (WOOD 3)
Grades: 
10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Occupational Education
Prerequisite: Wood Technologies 1 & 2

Advanced Woodworking is available to students who have taken Wood Technologies 1. Students chart their own curriculum and be self-directed in their project selection. Students design and build more complex projects that entail advanced techniques. Students are expected to choose projects that are more difficult in scale and research techniques needed to complete them.

CAREER CONNECT
Grades: 
11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Occupational Education

This course will focus on providing students with the necessary technology, leadership, and work-based skills to be successful in high school and beyond. Effective technology skills are used to develop strategies to make informed academic and career decisions. Students will assess abilities, skills, and interests to explore various pathway careers, experiences, and postsecondary educational programs.

SKILLED TRADES PRE-APPRENTICESHIP
Grades: 
10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: 0.5 credit for each semester completed (2-year block program)

Seattle Public Schools Skilled Trades Pre-Apprenticeship program offers students the opportunity to enter apprenticeships where they can earn industry level wages while they learn and gain mastery as they become journeymen and women in a variety of crafts in the construction industry.

Skilled Trades Pre-Apprenticeship Course will offer pre-apprenticeship training that will help students be prepared to enter construction or manufacturing apprenticeships, community college programs, or four-year degree options in construction management. This program will be an affiliate of ANEW’s Recognized Pre-Apprenticeship and is partnering with employers such as Sound Transit. Students can tour sites and apprenticeship training centers while they complete Skilled Trades modules in Construction, Masonry, Plumbing, Electrical, and Welding. Students will work together to construct a building such as a tiny house. Participation in this program will expose students directly with apprenticeship training facilities and potential employers. Some programs will come to our classroom and help with instruction and mentoring.

WORK-BASED LEARNING
Grades: 
10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: 0.5 credit for each semester completed
Requirement Satisfied: Occupational Education
Prerequisite: Must have a qualified job.

This course (internship) us a student worksite experience in a CTE course-related field that emphasizes connecting activities, coordination, and integration between worksite and classroom learning, uses written agreements to outline mutual expectations. Internships will meet District and State academic standards for academic credit. During an internship a student completes structured activities or projects that: Connect work to learning at school, relate to the real work of the company, give a broad understanding of a business or occupational area Reinforce 21st Century Skills.

Students must work a minimum of 180 hours to receive 0.5 credit.


Family and Consumer Science Education

The Family and Consumer Science Education classes are exploratory and preparatory courses. All students have the opportunity to become a member of Family Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA). An emphasis is on leadership skills related to employability and learning to balance work and family for productive lives.

NUTRITION AND WELLNESS
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Occupational Education or Science Elective (Grade 11, 12)

Nutrition and Wellness (Food Science I) is a specialized occupational course with an emphasis on the application of concepts about nutrition, food, and health in a food lab setting.

Culinary Arts 1A
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5 CTE
Prerequisite: Nutrition and Wellness

Learn more cooking techniques and skills! The food service production focus will be Franklin’s Café 19. Industry and restaurant skills learned will lead to culinary, hospitality, and food service careers. Follow-up certification occurs at the Seattle Skills Center.

Culinary Arts 1B
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Semester 0.5
Prerequisite: Nutrition and Wellness and Culinary Art 1A, Teacher Permission.

Build on previously learned skills from Nutrition and Wellness and Culinary Arts 1A. Industry and restaurant skills lead to culinary, hospitality, and food service careers. Follow-up certification occurs at the Seattle Skills Center.

FAMILY HEALTH
Grades: 
9
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 Credit

Family Health is course that is designed to prepare students for life- long decision making, problem solving, critical thinking and management skills related to health and wellness issues impacting individuals and families. This course integrates Washington Health essential learning with standards and competencies from the National Standards of Family and Consumer Sciences Education. The course focuses on the interrelationships of healthy choices and a productive satisfying life. Topics include personal health, wellness, and healthy living, careers, nutrition, growth and development, global, mental, community, environmental and reproductive health, health risks, communication, family living, fitness and safety, first aid; CPR, HIV/Aids and consumer health.

WORLD LANGUAGES

Courses in the World Language department are sequential. Students may not enter a level without successfully completing all preceding levels or demonstrating content knowledge through an appropriate assessment process. For students who need additional time or practice in the first or second levels of a language, it is possible to retake courses under a “Proficiency” title. Courses with suffix “A” are offered fall semester, and courses with suffix “B” in the spring. All world language courses are electives; all qualify for college entrance requirements.

CHINESE 1A/B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: World Language or Elective

Performance Level: Novice Low – Mid

Chinese 1 is a two-year middle school or one-year high school course that introduces students to Chinese language and Chinese culture. The course prepares students to carry on basic conversation in Chinese, read and write simple sentences about familiar topics, and explores how and where Chinese-speaking people live.

CHINESE 2A/B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: World Language or Elective

Performance Level: Novice Mid – High

Chinese 2 is a year-long high school course that builds upon skills developed in Chinese 1. The course prepares students to comprehend and sustain a conversation about travel and living abroad, health, leisure activities, holidays, and different ways of life. Students will read written materials on topics of personal interest and derive meaning from selected authentic texts. They will write about familiar topics and on a variety of lifestyles in Chinese. Close attention will be paid to developing communicative skills.

CHINESE 3A/B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: World Language or Elective
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Completion of Chinese 2 or equivalent

Performance Level: Novice Mid – High

Chinese 3 is a year-long high school course that builds upon skills developed in Chinese 2. The course prepares students to comprehend and sustain a conversation about travel and living abroad, health, leisure activities, holidays, and different ways of life. Students will read written materials on topics of personal interest and derive meaning from selected authentic texts. They will write about familiar topics and on a variety of lifestyles in Chinese. Close attention will be paid to developing communicative skills.

CHINESE 4A/B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: World Language or Elective
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Completion of Chinese 3 or equivalent

Performance Level: Intermediate Low-Mid.

Chinese 4 is a year-long high school course that builds upon skills developed in Chinese 3. The course prepares students to comprehend and sustain a conversation about travel and living abroad, health, leisure activities, holidays, and different ways of life. Students will read written materials on topics of personal interest and derive meaning from selected authentic texts. They will write about familiar topics and on a variety of lifestyles in Chinese. Close attention will be paid to developing communicative skills.

AP CHINESE
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: World Language or Elective
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Completion of Chinese 4 or equivalent

Mandarin Chinese AP is a one-year course for students with language proficiency of Intermediate-mid and higher. It serves as a preparation for the AP Chinese Language and Culture Exam. It is a comprehensive review to equip students both linguistically and culturally to communicate successfully about the topics relating to multiple aspects of Chinese society and culture. Students will explore a range of sources including literature, art, history, geography, Chinese society, and current events. Classroom instructions and interactions are conducted entirely in Mandarin Chinese, and students are expected to participate fully.

JAPANESE 1 A/B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit

Requirement Satisfied: World Language or Elective

Performance Level: Novice Low – Mid.

Japanese 1 is a year-long, two-semester high school course that introduces students to the Japanese language. Students show their understanding by using Japanese correctly in speaking, reading, writing, and listening activities. The course prepares students to develop their speaking and writing skills to meet the communication needs of real-life situations using Japanese. Students not only improve their communication skills in Japanese but also develop critical thinking skills along with a deeper appreciation of Japanese culture and of the cultural diversity in the world.

JAPANESE 2 A/B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: World Language or Elective

Performance Level: Novice Mid.

Japanese 2 is a year-long course that builds upon skills developed in Japanese I. Students learn language skills necessary to survive in Japan, express opinions and needs, have conversations in Japanese, and learn how to live like a local in any Japanese community. The course prepares students to comprehend and sustain a conversation about travel and living abroad, health, leisure activities, holidays, and different ways of life

JAPANESE 3 A/B
Grades: 
10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: World Language or Elective

Performance Level: Novice High.

Japanese 3 is a year-long, two-semester course that enables students to read 300 KANJI and write 150 KANJI. Students will engage in extended conversations, provide and obtain more detailed information, express feelings and emotions more precise nuances, and exchange more detailed opinions on a variety of topics. The course prepares students to interpret a greater variety of texts and audio sources and to present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of topics.

SPANISH 1 A/B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: World Language or Elective

Performance Level: Novice Low – Mid.

Spanish 1A is a high school course that introduces students to Spanish language and Spanish-speaking culture. The course prepares students to carry on a basic conversation in Spanish, read and write simple sentences about familiar topics and explores how and where Spanish-speaking people live

SPANISH 2 A/B
Grades
: 9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: World Language or Elective

Performance Level: Novice Mid – High.

Spanish 2 is a year-long high school course that builds upon skills developed in Spanish 1. The course prepares students to comprehend and sustain a conversation about self, family, friends, interests, daily routine, health, school, travel and personal history. Students will read written materials on topics of personal interest and derive meaning from selected authentic text. They will write about familiar topics and explore how and where Spanish-speaking people live. Close attention will be paid to developing communicative skills.

SPANISH 3A/B
Grades: 
10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: World Language or Elective

Performance Level: Novice High.

Spanish 3 is a year-long course in which students engage in extended conversations, provide and obtain more detailed information, express feelings and emotions with more precise nuances, and exchange more detailed opinions on a variety of topics. The course prepares students to interpret a greater variety of texts and audio sources and to present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of topics.

SPANISH 4 A/B
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: World Language or Elective
Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Spanish 3A/B or appropriate score on STAMP test or equivalent

Performance Level: Intermediate Low – Mid.

Spanish 4 is a year-long course that helps students develop and express opinions, debate meaningful issues, read and write in the Spanish language, and watch and understand Spanish media. The course prepares students to carry on complex and extended conversations in Spanish, read and write narrative, persuasive, and analytic essays, and to engage with the Spanish- speaking culture. Close attention will be paid to refining all communicative skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

SPANISH FOR HERTIAGE SPEAKERS
Grades: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Elective

This course is designed to help Spanish speakers improve their reading and writing skills. This is also for students who do not know how to read and write in Spanish, but speak Spanish at home or with family. Students who have been in Spanish immersion programs may also want to take this course. 

Este curso está diseñado para ayudar a los hispano hablantes a mejorar sus habilidades de lectura y escritura. Este es también para estudiantes que no saben leer y escribir en español, pero hablan español en en casa o en familia. Los estudiantes que han estado en programas de inmersión en español también pueden querer tome este curso.

AP SPANISH
Grades: 
10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: Full Year 1.0 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Elective
Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish 3A/B or 4A/B

Performance Level: Intermediate Mid–Intermediate High.

AP Spanish is a one-year high school course that emphasizes contemporary issues of global importance. The course prepares students to read about and view current events in the Spanish-speaking world. They will discuss and present a variety of viewpoints, defending and justifying their opinions about the various issues. Close attention will be paid to developing substantive arguments and negotiating to reach a consensus.

UPWARD BOUND – EXPOSITORY WRITING
Grades: 11
Length/Credit: Second Semester only 0.5 credit
Requirement Satisfied: Elective
Prerequisite: Must be in the Upward Bound Program

This course is designed to facilitate critical thinking, writing, communication, and basic technology skills. Along the way, students will explore a variety of articles on society, culture, and related issues. They will also function as peer-facilitators and editors. As UW Upward Bound Students, it is expected that they will apply to and complete all paperwork needed to apply to college. Furthermore, they will write college and scholarship essays, submit applications, and develop test-taking skills. This portion of the course is designed to help students develop their voice to the point that they can write convincingly and critically for college survival.


ONE WORLD NOW
Grade: 
9, 10, 11, 12
Length/Credit: 0.5 credit for each session completed
Requirement satisfied: World Language

One World Now is a non-profit organization that offers world language education outside of the school day for Chinese, Arabic, Korean, and Russian. Some of the classes are offered at Franklin. You can visit One World Now for more information.

The Skills Center is a public education program that delivers advanced, free Career and Technical Education to high school students who are at least 16 years old or who have earned at least 10 credits . Students attend classes every day. Students who successfully complete the classes will earn 1.5 credits per semester. Ultimately, students who complete Skills Center programs will earn industry certifications. If the Skills Center program is not located at the student’s home school, the student will travel to the school where the program is offered. Counselors will be able to enroll students in Skills Center programs located at other sites and then create a schedule that gives the student time to get to class. Please see your counselor if you are interested in applying for a skills center program.

  • Administrative Medical Assistant (Marshall)
  • Aerospace Science and Technology: Manufacturing (Rainier Beach)
  • Automotive Technology (Washington MS)
  • Construction Trades (Rainier Beach)
  • Culinary Arts (Rainier Beach)
  • Firefighting and Emergency Medical Services (Rainier Beach)
  • Health Sciences/Medical Assistance (Marshall)
  • Maritime Operations (TBD)
  • Maritime Science and Technology (R. Beach)
  • Media Arts: Video Production (Seattle World School)
  • Nursing Assistant (West Seattle)
  • Teaching Academy/Careers in Education (Alan T. Sugiyama)
  • Video Game Production (Marshall)
  • Video Game Animation (Marshall)

CITY CAMPUS- EXPLORATORY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM (XIP)
15 years and older, student with an IEP
Requirement Satisfied: Occupational Education
Prerequisite: Application Required, See Counselor and IEP Case Manager

Running Start

The Running Start program at the community college provides high school students the opportunity to enroll in college- level courses for college credit, tuition free, and earn high school credit at the same time. See your counselor with questions and to see if Running Start might work for you! Running Start is for students who:

  • Are at the 11th and 12th grade level
  • Are ready for college-level coursework in a college environment
  • Are ready to take some professional/technical courses
  • Want to take unique college-level courses not available at the high school
  • Seniors cannot take SPS graduation requirements during spring quarter

In addition to being at the 11th or 12th grade level, students will need to take English and Math assessments called the Wonderlic (English), and the ALEK (Math) at the community college, to demonstrate that they are prepared for college- level (above 100 level) work. Tuition is free. Students will be responsible for purchasing their own books, paying lab fees, and providing their own transportation to the college campuses. Fee waivers for books and the placement tests may be provided for students who qualify for free and reduced lunch.

The community college is on a quarter system; fall, winter, and spring quarters are part of the Running Start schedule. Summer quarter is not part of the Running Start program. Students are responsible for making sure classes they enroll in at the community college do not conflict with courses taken at Franklin. Students are not allowed to miss any part of their scheduled Franklin classes to attend Running Start classes. More information is available through the FHS Counseling Office and through Running Start Offices at each community college and on the community colleges’ websites.

Running Start students are assigned to an Advisory class that communicates online to support completion of the High School and Beyond plan. Running Start students must also complete a Student-Led Conference each year.